God and the State by Mikhail Bakunin (1814-1876) Translated by Benjamin R. Tucker (1854-1939) Bakunin's most famous work, published in various lengths, this version is the most complete form of the work published hitherto. Originally titled "Dieu et l'?tat", Bakunin intended it to be part of the second portion to a larger work named "The Knouto-Germanic Empire and the Social Revolution" (Knouto-Germanic Empire is in reference to a treaty betwixt Russia and Germany at the time), but the work Read more [...]
Letters of Two Brides by Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Translated by R.S. Scott. Letters of Two Brides is an epistolary novel. The two brides are Louise de Chaulieu (Madame Gaston) and Ren?e de Maucombe (Madame l'Estorade). The women became friends during their education at a convent and upon leaving began a life-long correspondence. For a 17 year period, they exchange letters describing their lives. Michelle Crandall reads Renee's letters, and Kara Shallenberg reads Louise's. Letters from Read more [...]
Studies in Pessimism by Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) Translated by T. Bailey Saunders (1860-1928) Arthur Schopenhauer, an early 19th century philosopher, made significant contributions to metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics. His work also informed theories of evolution and psychology, largely through his theory of the will to power -- a concept which Nietzsche famously adopted and developed. Despite this, he is today, as he was during his life, overshadowed by his contemporary, Hegel. Schopenhauer's Read more [...]
The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) Translated by W. K. Marriott The Prince (Italian: Il Principe) is a political treatise by the Italian diplomat, historian and political theorist Niccol? Machiavelli. From correspondence a version appears to have been distributed in 1513, using a Latin title, De Principatibus (About Principalities). But the printed version was not published until 1532, five years after Machiavelli's death. This was done with the permission of the Medici pope Clement Read more [...]
Five Beloved Stories by O. Henry (1862 - 1910) O. Henry wrote over 600 short stories. Naturally I have my personal top 20 stories that just seem to stand out because of their form, writing style and ability to convey real personalities in a very few words. From these 20 I've chosen five that seem outstanding examples of the short story art form. Stories like The Gift of the Magi; The Cop and the Anthem; Man about Town; A Cosmopolite in a Cafe and Mammon and the Archer. So this is a collection Read more [...]
Movies and Hollywood Short Story Collection, by Various Fiction about (or involving) motion pictures started appearing in the late nineteenth-century, when writers first became aware of early kinetoscope technologies. These stories grew more and more popular as the public became increasingly fascinated with the movies, the film industry, and the odd inhabitants of Hollywood. These stories reflect and often respond to the public's fascination with the movies; at the same time, they also reveal Read more [...]
The Four Million by O. Henry (1862-1910) Born in 1862 and died in 1910, O. Henry's birth name is William Sydney Porter; however, he adopted the pen name O. Henry while in prison. He published 10 collections and over 600 short stories during his lifetime. The Four Million is the second book written by O. Henry while he served time for embezzlement in a penitentiary in Ohio. The book is a series of short stories which take place in New York City in the early years of the 20th century and are Read more [...]
The Trimmed Lamp : and other Stories of the Four Million by O. Henry (1862-1910) Born in 1862 and died in 1910, O. Henry's birth name is William Sydney Porter; however, he adopted the pen name O. Henry while in prison. He published 10 collections and over 600 short stories during his lifetime. The Trimmed Lamp follows The Four Million and provides another series of short stories that take place in New York City in the early years of the 20th century and are representative of the surprise endings Read more [...]
Queen Lucia by E. F. Benson (1867-1940) E. F. Benson (1867-1940) was born at Wellington College in Berkshire, where his father, who later went on to become the Archbishop of Canterbury, was the first Headmaster. He wrote 105 books in all. Queen Lucia (first published in 1920) was the first of Benson's 'Mapp and Lucia' novels of which there were six. This first book is a comedy of manners based in the provincial village of Riseholme, where Emmeline Lucas (the Queen Lucia of the title) presides Read more [...]
The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton (1862-1937) In an era before the advent of electric lights, telephones or motor vehicles, there exists a small cluster of aristocratic "old revolutionary stock" families that rule New York's social life. Under the rules of this society, "being things" is better than "doing things" and reputation and outward appearances come at the exclusion of everything else. In this Gilded Age, when America's expansion and increased industrialism produce a group of newly Read more [...]
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950) Tarzan of the Apes is Burroughs' exciting, if improbable, story of an English lord, left by the death of his stranded parents in the hands of a motherly African ape who raises him as her own. Although he is aware that he is different from the apes of his tribe, who are neither white nor hairless, he nevertheless regards them as his "people." When older, larger, stronger apes decide that he an undesirable to be killed or expelled from the Read more [...]
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Dorian Gray, a young man of wealth and stature in late 1800's London, meets Lord Henry Wotton while posing for a portrait by his friend Basil Hallward. Once the painting is complete, Dorian realizes that it will always be young and attractive, while he will be forced to age and wither with the years. Carelessly, he wishes the opposite were true. What happens is a treatise on morals, self-indulgence and how crucial personal responsibility is Read more [...]
The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a novella by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886. London lawyer Utterson is driven to investigate Edward Hyde, the unlikely prot?g? of his friend Dr Henry Jekyll, suspecting the relationship to be founded on blackmail. The truth is worse than he could have imagined. Jekyll's 'full statement of the case', the final chapter of the book, explores Read more [...]
Shakespeare Monologues by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 -- April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres -- tragedy, comedy, romance, &c -- that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are very moving. Each monologue will touch everybody Read more [...]